Exit Prompt Draft and Final

Exit Prompt Draft and Final

Draft:

Students constantly have to learn new ways to become better writers as well as better at finding “global” mistakes in papers.  Global mistakes tend to be very overlooked by students because they feel that once they have written a paper they simply have to edit for small grammatical problems and turn it in. When I initially started in the ENG 122/123 program I was one of those students. I never thought to make global changes that were going to affect my paper. In “Revision Strategies of Student Writers and Experienced Adult Writers” by Nancy Sommers, she discusses the approaches that students have on the revision plan.

Every student has a different approach of revision plans, but most tend to only look at local errors.  Sommers writes, “the students solve the immediate problem, but blind themselves to problems on a textual level.” What she means here is that students will look at the local errors, thus fixing the problems that are grammatical.  Then they completely overlook the aspect of whether the essay has flow.  At the beginning of my writing for this class I saw a lot of pieces of work that needed to get this revision that was looking at it as more of a whole.  For example, the essay that we were asked to write about specific literacy narratives I really could have done so many global revisions. Some of the changes I could have made were reworking the intro, as well as making my body paragraphs have better transitions.

This work was done during first semester, when I didn’t fully understand what global revisions meant. Sommers defines this situation as, “Such blindness, as I discovered with the student writers, is the inability to “see” revision as a process: the inability to “re-view”.  What she means by this is that students almost put up a blinder to the big picture revisions that need to happen.  Personally, I was one who would see their writing as once I wrote a rough draft there wasn’t much change that was made to the overall body of the essay.  That was until this semester, when I started taking the time to look at the global changes.  It was in the literary analysis paper that I really sat down and made global changes to my paper.  One of the largest changes that I made was changing the introduction. I decide that a Barclay’s paragraph would better explain my argument then just simply introducing my argument.

When I first got to college the idea of doing global revisions was a very foreign concept to me. The idea of changing a paper by full paragraphs to make it flow better was something that I wasn’t used to. It initially seemed like more work but now it seems as a necessity.  No good paper is simply written in one long haul and comes out perfectly.  Writing takes time, you have to write and rewrite till you find the right flow of words that work as a whole.  

Final:

Students constantly have to learn new ways to become better writers as well as better at finding “global” mistakes in papers. Global mistakes tend to be very overlooked by students because they feel that once they have written a paper they simply have to edit for small grammatical problems and turn it in. When I initially started in the ENG 122/123 program I was one of those students. I never thought to make global changes that were going to affect my paper. I always struggled with the revision process because when people would ask me to peer edit I never knew what to say or if what I was saying was wrong. Once I got to college in became very clear that revisions for essays would become a huge aspect to the writing process. In “Revision Strategies of Student Writers and Experienced Adult Writers” by Nancy Sommers, she discusses the approaches that students have on the revision plan.

Every student has a different approach of revision plans, but most tend to only look at local errors. Sommers writes, “the students solve the immediate problem, but blind themselves to problems on a textual level.” What she means here is that students will look at the local errors, thus fixing the problems that are grammatical. Then students completely overlook the aspect of whether the essay has flow. At the beginning of my writing for this class I saw a lot of pieces of work that needed to get this revision that was looking at it as more of a whole. For example, the essay that we were asked to write about specific literacy narratives it basically gave an insight to our interaction with reading and writing. My paper titled “Blank Screen”, which was about how I wrote my college essay and the hardship I went through with actually getting the paper started as well as keeping my voice in the paper. I really could have done so many global revisions. Some of the changes I could have made were reworking the introduction, as well as making my body paragraphs have better transitions. We wrote the paper in ENG 122 and I hadn’t quite figured out what global revisions were, but then in ENG 123 I finally started to get the just of it.

This work was done during first semester, when I didn’t fully understand what global revisions meant. Sommers defines this situation as, “Such blindness, as I discovered with the student writers, is the inability to “see” revision as a process: the inability to “re-view”. What she means by this is that students almost put up a blinder to the big picture revisions that need to happen. Personally, I was one who would see that every paper I wrote that, once I wrote a rough draft there wasn’t much change that was made to the overall body of the essay.   That was until this semester, when I started taking the time to look at the global changes. It was in the literary analysis paper that I really sat down and made global changes to my paper. One of the largest changes that I made was changing the introduction. I decide that a Barclay’s paragraph would better explain my argument then just simply introducing my argument For example the first few sentences of my rough draft were, “Literacy narratives can be defined as a written piece of work by authors to help explain their relationship with writing and reading.  These literacy narratives can be seen as being either a hero or victim story.  A majority of literacy narratives are hero narrative”. Then when I went back I changed the start to,” Literacy narratives are an insight to the author’s relationship with reading and writing. Some authors that really focus on these literacy narratives are Lisa Delpit, Deborah Brandt, James Paul Gee, and Kara Poe Alexander. One aspect of literacy narratives that I decide to do my research on with the help of those authors was how influential people effected student’s outlook on reading and writing also if its successful or not.” These huge amounts of change were made through global changes in order better build my argument.

When I first got to college the idea of doing global revisions was a very foreign concept to me. The idea of changing a paper by full paragraphs to make it flow better was something that I wasn’t used to. It initially seemed like more work but now it seems as a necessity. No good paper is simply written in one long haul and comes out perfectly. Writing takes time, you have to write and rewrite till you find the right flow of words that work as a whole.